A Free Template from Joomlashack

A Free Template from Joomlashack

แบบสำรวจ

ท่านกำลังใช้ระบบปฏิบัติการ (OS) อะไรอยู่ ?
 

Search

ผู้เข้าเว็บขณะนี้

เรามี 133 บุคคลทั่วไป ออนไลน์
Angkor Wat and Angkor Thom Land of the Gods PDF พิมพ์ อีเมล
เขียนโดย Administrator   
วันอังคารที่ 26 เมษายน 2016 เวลา 02:47 น.

 
 

Angkor Wat at Sunset, Cambodia

Angkor Wat at sunset, Cambodia

 

 

 

 Angkor Land of the Gods Part 1 Empire Rising

 

 

 

 
          Angkor Wat (Khmer: អង្គរវត្ត or "Capital Temple") is a temple complex in Cambodia and the largest religious monument in the world, with site measuring 162.6 hectares (1,626,000 sq meters). It was originally constructed as a Hindu temple for the Khmer Empire, gradually transforming into a Buddhist temple toward the end of the 12th century. It was built by the Khmer King Suryavarman II in the early 12th century in Yaśodharapura (Khmer: យសោធរបុរៈ, present-day Angkor), the capital of the Khmer Empire, as his state temple and eventual mausoleum. Breaking from the Shaiva tradition of previous kings, Angkor Wat was instead dedicated to Vishnu. As the best-preserved temple at the site, it is the only one to have remained a significant religious center since its foundation. The temple is at the top of the high classical style of Khmer architecture. It has become a symbol of Cambodia, appearing on its national flag, and it is the country's prime attraction for visitors.
 
 
Angkor Wat Temple, Cambodia

  Angkor Wat was first a Hindu, then subsequently a Buddhist, temple complex in Cambodia and the largest religious monument in the world.

 
 
 
 
 
          Angkor Wat combines two basic plans of Khmer temple architecture: the temple-mountain and the later galleried temple. It is designed to represent Mount Meru, home of the devas in Hindu mythology: within a moat and an outer wall 3.6 kilometres (2.2 mi) long are three rectangular galleries, each raised above the next. At the centre of the temple stands a quincunx of towers. Unlike most Angkorian temples, Angkor Wat is oriented to the west; scholars are divided as to the significance of this. The temple is admired for the grandeur and harmony of the architecture, its extensive bas-reliefs, and for the numerous devatas adorning its walls.
 
 
 
          The modern name, Angkor Wat, means "Temple City" or "City of Temples" in Khmer; Angkor, meaning "city" or "capital city", is a vernacular form of the word nokor (នគរ), which comes from the Sanskrit word nagara (Devanāgarī: नगर). Wat is the Khmer word for "temple grounds", also derived from Sanskrit vāṭa (Devanāgarī: वाट), meaning "enclosure"

 




 Angkor Wat at Sunset, Cambodia

Angkor Wat at sunset, Cambodia

 

 

 Angkor Land of the Gods Part 2 Throne of Power

 

 

 Angkor Wat, Cambodia

Angkor Wat  in Cambodia 

 

 

 

 Sunrise at Angkor Wat Cambodia

Sunrise at Angkor Wat Cambodia

 

 

 

 

 

Angkor Thom

Angkor Thom in Cambodia

 

 

 

 Angkor Thom

 

 

 

 


          Angkor Thom (Khmer: អង្គរធំ; literally: "Great City"), located in present-day Cambodia, was the last and most enduring capital city of the Khmer empire. It was established in the late twelfth century by King Jayavarman VII. It covers an area of 9 km², within which are located several monuments from earlier eras as well as those established by Jayavarman and his successors. At the centre of the city is Jayavarman's state temple, the Bayon, with the other major sites clustered around the Victory Square immediately to the north.
 
 
 

 
 
          Angkor Thom was established as the capital of Jayavarman VII's empire, and was the centre of his massive building programme. One inscription found in the city refers to Jayavarman as the groom and the city as his bride.
 
 
 
 
           Angkor Thom seems not to be the first Khmer capital on the site, however. Yasodharapura, dating from three centuries earlier, was centred slightly further northwest, and Angkor Thom overlapped parts of it. The most notable earlier temples within the city are the former state temple of Baphuon, and Phimeanakas, which was incorporated into the Royal Palace. The Khmers did not draw any clear distinctions between Angkor Thom and Yashodharapura: even in the fourteenth century an inscription used the earlier name. The name of Angkor Thom—great city—was in use from the 16th century.
 
 
 
 
          The last temple known to have been constructed in Angkor Thom was Mangalartha, which was dedicated in 1295. Thereafter the existing structures continued to be modified from time to time, but any new creations were in perishable materials and have not survived.
 
 
 
          The Ayutthaya Kingdom, led by King Borommarachathirat II, sacked Angkor Thom, forcing the Khmers under Ponhea Yat to relocate their capital southeast.
 
 
 
          Angkor Thom was abandoned some time prior to 1609, when an early western visitor wrote of an uninhabited city, "as fantastic as the Atlantis of Plato". It is believed to have sustained a population of 80,000–150,000 people.



From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 
 


 
แก้ไขล่าสุด ( วันพุธที่ 27 เมษายน 2016 เวลา 02:40 น. )
 

เพิ่มคอมเมนต์ใหม่

 


Joomla 1.5 Templates by Joomlashack